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Why Do Women Love Glitter?

Although I definitely don't have the skills of a qualified professional MUA, I hope you try to incorporate different styles into your makeup, glitter, and pretty much everything you dazzle.

I'm not the only woman who loves glitz and glamour. I've experimented with glitter in the past, but my it was usually limited to nights and accompanying Halloween costumes. I wonder what people think about me wearing glittery things in daylight and carrying on with my everyday life? I find myself in many of the same situations that others find themselves in. Wearing glittery clothes or glittery dresses is a way to add a lot of glamour to your look right away.

 


As a premature baby, it was a source of personal euphoria for me, and I'm a big fan of glitter makeup. Glittering makeup is a way to bridge the line between prepubescent and bloated teenagers, or at least to create the stuff that transcends fantasies and boundaries.

I thought my love of body glitter and sparkling make-up would fade with age, but wearable glitter looks remain magical to me, carrying a kind of witchcraft, a kind of breathless ecstasy. To achieve my sparkling pout, I first painted my Candy Apple with Lime Crime Carousel Gloss, that is, with the brush I use to dab the aforementioned Zodiac Glitter directly onto my lips. A friend I'm in a band with seems to have tarred all my sparkest makeup looks with the same brush.

I like this look so much that we discussed using it for Christmas concerts, and I'm a bit of a fan of this look.

I started this experiment because I thought I would get a lot more harsh feedback from the public that adult women shouldn't wear sparkles. Instead, I found that few people ever showed a strong reaction, and the comments I received were generally positive, starting with teasing jokes about my partner. I recommend that everyone try it, whether you wear glittery things on your face for weeks on end no matter what others think.

 


When it comes to fashion and beauty, many of us tend to set the rules for ourselves, and on the third day we want to stick to the gems. When I got home from selling my car, I forgot about my makeup for the rest of the day.

I'm a big fan of pink and gold, so to truly embrace my style, I chose a pink lace blouse with an embellished collar.

My love of sparkle knows no bounds, especially when it comes to eyeshadow. While I like the look of this style, I don't enjoy the distracting reflection that the gems evoke when the light of my computer shines through my glasses.

I spent the day with my goddaughter, doing each of my nails in a different color. I have been training and making nails with numerals in different colors.

I know this is not just an aesthetic preference, as studies have shown that even babies stare at a shiny set of keys - staring with their mouths - and at glassy mirrors. There are even children as young as three who wear glittery, sparkling gems on their fingers and toes.

The answer is tied to one of the most fundamental needs we all have: a sense of self-worth and the desire to be loved and respected.

It sounds like a blunt, semi-ironic remark when you try to make sense of something that has long been considered meaningless, banal, and superficial. To some extent, it is because some of us have long thought that such a thing represents a kind of feminine frivolity while others have felt embarrassed by it for centuries. In some aspects of our visual culture, glitter has something to do with cave painting, something Cleopatra and Beyonce did in the time before Christ, or something that cavemen did.

 



The word "glitter" comes from the Old Norse word "glitra", a verb that means "glitter." There is an association between glamour, charming fairies, and elves, which is like having a Katy Perry lookalike send sparkling bits diagnosed by the audience as a symptom of a detached retina. The motion also vaguely resembles the blowing of kisses (which also explains the use of the word "bubbles" in the words "blow" and "kiss").

Kendall and Kylie Jenner open their mouths in a commercial for PacSun's 2015 holiday collection. As floats in the air around them, it seems like a good destination for Christmas parties and shopping.

    






Sources:

https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/3dxmp3/the-history-of-glitter

https://www.byrdie.com/history-of-glitter

https://slate.com/human-interest/2016/12/why-do-women-in-ads-blow-glitter-at-us-every-holiday-season.html

https://www.treehugger.com/ooo-shiny-why-are-we-attracted-glossy-sparkly-things-4863494

https://www.getthegloss.com/article/the-irrepressible-joy-of-glitter-eyeshadow-at-any-age

https://www.bustle.com/articles/124352-i-wore-sparkly-things-on-my-face-for-a-week-this-is-what-i-learned


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